Neural Plasticity

Neural Plasticity / 2007 / Article
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Plasticity and Anxiety

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Research Article | Open Access

Volume 2007 |Article ID 35457 | 8 pages | https://doi.org/10.1155/2007/35457

Anxiety in Mice: A Principal Component Analysis Study

Academic Editor: Hymie Anisman
Received31 Jul 2006
Revised15 Dec 2006
Accepted07 Jan 2007
Published20 Mar 2007

Abstract

Two principal component analyses of anxiety were undertaken investigating two strains of mice (ABP/Le and C57BL/6ByJ) in two different experiments, both classical tests for assessing anxiety in rodents. The elevated plus-maze and staircase were used for the first experiment, and a free exploratory paradigm and light-dark discrimination were used for the second. The components in the analyses produced definitions of four fundamental behavior patterns: novelty-induced anxiety, general activity, exploratory behavior, and decision making. We also noted that the anxious phenotype was determined by both strain and experimental procedure. The relationship between behavior patterns and the use of specific tests plus links with the genetic background are discussed.

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Copyright © 2007 Yan Clément et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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