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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2007 (2007), Article ID 52087, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/52087
Review Article

The Importance of Cognitive Phenotypes in Experimental Modeling of Animal Anxiety and Depression

Laboratory of Clinical Science, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-1264, USA

Received 6 March 2007; Accepted 5 June 2007

Academic Editor: Georges Chapouthier

Copyright © 2007 Allan V. Kalueff and Dennis L. Murphy. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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