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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2007, Article ID 52908, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/52908
Review Article

Endocannabinoid System and Synaptic Plasticity: Implications for Emotional Responses

Departamento de Fisiología (Fisiología Animal II), Facultad de Biología, Universidad Complutense, Madrid 28040, Spain

Received 18 December 2006; Revised 9 March 2007; Accepted 30 April 2007

Academic Editor: Patrice Venault

Copyright © 2007 María-Paz Viveros et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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