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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2007, Article ID 73754, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/73754
Review Article

Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Depressive Disorders, and Antidepressant Therapy

1INSERM, U677, Paris 75013, France
2Faculté de Médecine Pierre et Marie Curie, Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Site Pitié-Salpêtrière, IFR 70 des Neurosciences, UMR S677, Paris 75013, France

Received 30 November 2006; Accepted 5 March 2007

Academic Editor: Georges Chapouthier

Copyright © 2007 Eleni Paizanis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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