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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2007 (2007), Article ID 79102, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/79102
Research Article

Microinfusion of Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide into the Central Nucleus of Amygdala of the Rat Produces a Shift from an Active to Passive Mode of Coping in the Shock-Probe Fear/Defensive Burying Test

1Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612, USA
2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, 3515 East Fletcher Avenue, Tampa, FL 33613, USA
3Department of Psychology, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Avenue, PCD 4118G, Tampa, FL 33620, USA
4Medical Research Service, Veterans Hospital, 13000 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33612, USA
5Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612, USA

Received 2 February 2007; Accepted 18 March 2007

Academic Editor: Georges Chapouthier

Copyright © 2007 Gabor Legradi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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