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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2008, Article ID 194097, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/194097
Research Article

Exposure to Forced Swim Stress Alters Local Circuit Activity and Plasticity in the Dentate Gyrus of the Hippocampus

1Department of Psychobiology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Haifa, Haifa 31905, Israel
2The Brain and Behavior Research Center, University of Haifa, Haifa 31905, Israel

Received 21 March 2007; Accepted 3 December 2007

Academic Editor: Bruno Poucet

Copyright © 2008 Orli Yarom et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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