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Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 516328, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/516328
Research Article

Behavioral Consequences of Delta-Opioid Receptor Activation in the Periaqueductal Gray of Morphine Tolerant Rats

1Department of Psychology, Washington State University Vancouver, 14204 NE Salmon Creek Avenue, Vancouver, WA 98686, USA
2Brain and Mind Research Institute, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia

Received 2 June 2008; Revised 5 September 2008; Accepted 11 December 2008

Academic Editor: Thelma A. Lovick

Copyright © 2009 Michael M. Morgan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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