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Volume 2009, Article ID 768398, 25 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/768398
Research Article

High-Dose Glycine Treatment of Refractory Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Body Dysmorphic Disorder in a 5-Year Period

1Department of Medicine, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Columbia University, New York, NY 10019, USA
2Department of Radiology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA
3Department of Pediatrics, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA

Received 15 May 2009; Revised 12 August 2009; Accepted 4 December 2009

Academic Editor: Zygmunt Galdzicki

Copyright © 2009 W. Louis Cleveland et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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