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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 769207, 29 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/769207
Review Article

Dendritic Spines and Development: Towards a Unifying Model of Spinogenesis—A Present Day Review of Cajal's Histological Slides and Drawings

Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Neurobiology, Instituto Cajal, CSIC, Avenida Doctor Arce 37, 28002 Madrid, Spain

Received 23 September 2010; Accepted 14 November 2010

Academic Editor: Michael Stewart

Copyright © 2010 Pablo García-López et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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