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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2012, Article ID 350574, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/350574
Review Article

Plasticity-Inducing TMS Protocols to Investigate Somatosensory Control of Hand Function

1Department of Kinesiology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1
2Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 1A1

Received 17 January 2012; Revised 27 February 2012; Accepted 14 March 2012

Academic Editor: Marie-Hélène Canu

Copyright © 2012 M. Jacobs et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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