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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2012, Article ID 728267, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/728267
Review Article

What We Know and Would Like to Know about CDKL5 and Its Involvement in Epileptic Encephalopathy

1Theoretical and Applied Sciences, Division of Biomedical Research, University of Insubria, 21052 Busto Arsizio, Italy
2San Raffaele Rett Research Center, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20132 Milan, Italy

Received 16 February 2012; Accepted 6 April 2012

Academic Editor: Hansen Wang

Copyright © 2012 Charlotte Kilstrup-Nielsen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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