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Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 854285, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/854285
Review Article

Functional Role of Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis as a Therapeutic Strategy for Mental Disorders

1Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo College of Medicine, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
2Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship Program, Mayo Graduate School, Mayo College of Medicine, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo College of Medicine, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA

Received 15 September 2012; Revised 30 November 2012; Accepted 30 November 2012

Academic Editor: Chitra D. Mandyam

Copyright © 2012 Heechul Jun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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