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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2012, Article ID 902510, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/902510
Research Article

Effect of Vocal Nerve Section on Song and ZENK Protein Expression in Area X in Adult Male Zebra Finches

Key Laboratory of Ecology and Environmental Science in Higher Education of Guangdong Province, School of Life Science, South China Normal University, Guangdong, Guangzhou 510631, China

Received 3 August 2012; Revised 25 October 2012; Accepted 25 October 2012

Academic Editor: Małgorzata Kossut

Copyright © 2012 Congshu Liao and Dongfeng Li. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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