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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2013, Article ID 103949, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/103949
Review Article

Is Sleep Essential for Neural Plasticity in Humans, and How Does It Affect Motor and Cognitive Recovery?

1Department of Psychology, “Sapienza” University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy
2Institute of Neurology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, 00168 Rome, Italy
3IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, 00163 Rome, Italy
4IRCCS Fondazione Santa Lucia, 00179 Rome, Italy

Received 26 February 2013; Revised 28 May 2013; Accepted 29 May 2013

Academic Editor: Sergio Bagnato

Copyright © 2013 Maurizio Gorgoni et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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