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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2013, Article ID 397176, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/397176
Review Article

The Visual Callosal Connection: A Connection Like Any Other?

1Brain Institute, University of Rio Grande do Norte, Av. Nascimento de Castro 2155, 59056-450 Natal, RN, Brazil
2Max-Planck-Institute for Brain Research, Deutschordenstrasse 46, 60528 Frankfurt, Germany

Received 7 November 2012; Accepted 27 February 2013

Academic Editor: Maurice Ptito

Copyright © 2013 Kerstin E. Schmidt. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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