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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 879047, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/879047
Research Article

Increased Signal Complexity Improves the Breadth of Generalization in Auditory Perceptual Learning

1Biological and Experimental Psychology Group, School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, UK
2Department of Psychology, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, UK

Received 20 June 2013; Accepted 11 October 2013

Academic Editor: Lin Chen

Copyright © 2013 David J. Brown and Michael J. Proulx. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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