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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2014, Article ID 123026, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/123026
Research Article

Fluoxetine Dose and Administration Method Differentially Affect Hippocampal Plasticity in Adult Female Rats

1GIGA-Neurosciences, University of Liège, 1 Avenue de l’Hôpital, Bâtiment B36, 4000 Liège, Belgium
2School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Universiteitssingel 40, 6229 ER Maastricht, The Netherlands
3Department of Biological Sciences, Irvine Hall, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701, USA
4Laboratory of Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Department of Pharmacy, CIRM, University of Liège, 1 Avenue de l’Hôpital, Bâtiment B36, 4000 Liège, Belgium

Received 27 December 2013; Accepted 7 February 2014; Published 17 March 2014

Academic Editor: Paul Lucassen

Copyright © 2014 Jodi L. Pawluski et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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