Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Neural Plasticity
Volume 2014, Article ID 269120, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/269120
Research Article

Activation of the Prefrontal Cortex While Performing a Task at Preferred Slow Pace and Metronome Slow Pace: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

Department of Rehabilitation, Gunma University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 3-39-22 Showa, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8514, Japan

Received 9 May 2014; Revised 28 September 2014; Accepted 3 October 2014; Published 10 November 2014

Academic Editor: Małgorzata Kossut

Copyright © 2014 Kaori Shimoda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. K. Naruse, H. Sakuma, and T. Hirai, “Properties of internal speed control and psychophysiological response during continuous forearm rotation movement,” Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 93, no. 2, pp. 387–396, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. F. L. Smoll, “Preferred tempo in performance of repetitive movements,” Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 40, no. 2, pp. 439–442, 1975. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. F. L. Smoll, “Between-days consistency in personal tempo,” Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 41, no. 3, pp. 731–734, 1975. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  4. S. Taguchi, J. A. Gliner, S. M. Horvath, and E. Nakamura, “Preferred tempo, work intensity, and mechanical efficiency.,” Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 52, no. 2, pp. 443–451, 1981. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. G. Goldberg, “Supplementary motor area structure and function: review and hypotheses,” Behavioral and Brain Sciences, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 567–588, 1985. View at Google Scholar
  6. M.-P. Deiber, M. Honda, V. Ibañez, N. Sadato, and M. Hallett, “Mesial motor areas in self-initiated versus externally triggered movements examined with fMRI: effect of movement type and rate,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 81, no. 6, pp. 3065–3077, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. R. Kawashima, K. Inoue, M. Sugiura, K. Okada, A. Ogawa, and H. Fukuda, “A positron emission tomography study of self-paced finger movements at different frequencies,” Neuroscience, vol. 92, no. 1, pp. 107–112, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. I. H. Jenkins, M. Jahanshahi, M. Jueptner, R. E. Passingham, and D. J. Brooks, “Self-initiated versus externally triggered movements. II. The effect of movement predictability on regional cerebral blood flow,” Brain, vol. 123, no. 6, pp. 1216–1228, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. P. van Donkelaar, J. F. Stein, R. E. Passingham, and R. C. Miall, “Neuronal activity in the primate motor thalamus during visually triggered and internally generated limb movements,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 82, no. 2, pp. 934–945, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. M. Jahanshahi, I. H. Jenkins, R. G. Brown, C. D. Marsden, R. E. Passingham, and D. J. Brooks, “Self-initiated versus externally triggered movements I. An investigation using measurement of regional cerebral blood flow with PET and movement-related potentials in normal and Parkinson's disease subjects,” Brain, vol. 118, no. 4, pp. 913–933, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. F. F. Jobsis, “Noninvasive, infrared monitoring of cerebral and myocardial oxygen sufficiency and circulatory parameters,” Science, vol. 198, no. 4323, pp. 1264–1267, 1977. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. D. T. Delpy and M. Cope, “Quantification in tissue near-infrared spectroscopy,” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, vol. 352, no. 1354, pp. 649–659, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. D. R. Leff, F. Orihuela-Espina, C. E. Elwell et al., “Assessment of the cerebral cortex during motor task behaviours in adults: a systematic review of functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) studies,” NeuroImage, vol. 54, no. 4, pp. 2922–2936, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. M. Ferrari and V. Quaresima, “A brief review on the history of human functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) development and fields of application,” NeuroImage, vol. 63, no. 2, pp. 921–935, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. Y. Takei, M. Suda, Y. Aoyama et al., “Temporal lobe and inferior frontal gyrus dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia during face-to-face conversation: a near-infrared spectroscopy study,” Journal of Psychiatric Research, vol. 47, no. 11, pp. 1581–1589, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. M. Suzuki, I. Miyai, T. Ono et al., “Prefrontal and premotor cortices are involved in adapting walking and running speed on the treadmill: an optical imaging study,” NeuroImage, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 1020–1026, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. M. Okamoto, H. Dan, K. Shimizu et al., “Multimodal assessment of cortical activation during apple peeling by NIRS and fMRI,” NeuroImage, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 1275–1288, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. K. Shimoda, S. Katsuyama, B. Lee et al., “Preferred pace tapping activates the frontal lobe,” Kitakanto Medical Journal, vol. 62, no. 3, pp. 271–276, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. R. C. Oldfield, “The assessment and analysis of handedness: the Edinburgh inventory,” Neuropsychologia, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 97–113, 1971. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. A. Henderson, N. Korner-Bitensky, and M. Levin, “Virtual reality in stroke rehabilitation: a systematic review of its effectiveness for upper limb motor recovery,” Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 52–61, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. K. Takeda, Y. Gomi, I. Imai, N. Shimoda, M. Hiwatari, and H. Kato, “Shift of motor activation areas during recovery from hemiparesis after cerebral infarction: a longitudinal study with near-infrared spectroscopy,” Neuroscience Research, vol. 59, no. 2, pp. 136–144, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. R. Nakamura, S. Moriyama, Y. Yamada, and K. Seki, “Recovery of impaired motor function of the upper extremity after stroke.,” Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol. 168, no. 1, pp. 11–20, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. D. T. Delpy, M. Cope, P. van der Zee, S. Arridge, S. Wray, and J. Wyatt, “Estimation of optical pathlength through tissue from direct time of flight measurement,” Physics in Medicine and Biology, vol. 33, no. 12, pp. 1433–1442, 1988. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. D. Tsuzuki, V. Jurcak, A. K. Singh, M. Okamoto, E. Watanabe, and I. Dan, “Virtual spatial registration of stand-alone fNIRS data to MNI space,” NeuroImage, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 1506–1518, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. J. C. Ye, S. Tak, K. E. Jang, J. Jung, and J. Jang, “NIRS-SPM: statistical parametric mapping for near-infrared spectroscopy,” NeuroImage, vol. 44, no. 2, pp. 428–447, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. M. Brett, I. S. Johnsrude, and A. M. Owen, “The problem of functional localization in the human brain,” Nature Reviews Neuroscience, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 243–249, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. J. L. Lancaster, M. G. Woldorff, L. M. Parsons et al., “Automated Talairach Atlas labels for functional brain mapping,” Human Brain Mapping, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 120–131, 2000. View at Google Scholar
  28. C. Rorden and M. Brett, “Stereotaxic display of brain lesions,” Behavioural Neurology, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 191–200, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. Y. Hoshi, N. Kobayashi, and M. Tamura, “Interpretation of near-infrared spectroscopy signals: a study with a newly developed perfused rat brain model,” Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 90, no. 5, pp. 1657–1662, 2001. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. A. M. Owen, A. C. Evans, and M. Petrides, “Evidence for a two-stage model of spatial working memory processing within the lateral frontal cortex: a positron emission tomography study,” Cerebral Cortex, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 31–38, 1996. View at Google Scholar
  31. A. Baddeley, “Working memory and language: an overview,” Journal of Communication Disorders, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 189–208, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. K. Christoff and J. D. E. Gabrieli, “The frontopolar cortex and human cognition: evidence for a rostrocaudal hierarchical organization within the human prefrontal cortex,” Psychobiology, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 168–186, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. D. Badre and M. D'Esposito, “Is the rostro-caudal axis of the frontal lobe hierarchical?” Nature Reviews Neuroscience, vol. 10, no. 9, pp. 659–669, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. K. Christoff, J. M. Ream, L. P. T. Geddes, and J. D. E. Gabrieli, “Evaluating self-generated information: Anterior prefrontal contributions to human cognition,” Behavioral Neuroscience, vol. 117, no. 6, pp. 1161–1168, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. P. C. Fletcher and R. N. A. Henson, “Frontal lobes and human memory insights from functional neuroimaging,” Brain, vol. 124, no. 5, pp. 849–881, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. C. S. Soon, M. Brass, H.-J. Heinze, and J.-D. Haynes, “Unconscious determinants of free decisions in the human brain,” Nature Neuroscience, vol. 11, no. 5, pp. 543–545, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. P. Haggard, “Human volition: towards a neuroscience of will,” Nature Reviews Neuroscience, vol. 9, no. 12, pp. 934–946, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. S. Bode, A. H. He, C. S. Soon, R. Trampel, R. Turner, and J.-D. Haynes, “Tracking the unconscious generation of free decisions using uitra-high field fMRI,” PLoS ONE, vol. 6, no. 6, Article ID e21612, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. M. Ferrari, Q. Wei, R. A. de Blasi, V. Quaresima, and G. Zaccanti, “Variability of human brain and muscle optical pathlength in different experimental conditions,” in Photon Migration and Imaging in Random Media and Tissues, vol. 1888 of Proceedings of SPIE, pp. 466–472, 1993.
  40. A. Duncan, J. H. Meek, M. Clemence et al., “Optical pathlength measurements on adult head, calf and forearm and the head of the newborn infant using phase resolved optical spectroscopy,” Physics in Medicine and Biology, vol. 40, no. 2, pp. 295–304, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. H. Zhao, Y. Tanikawa, F. Gao et al., “Maps of optical differential pathlength factor of human adult forehead, somatosensory motor and occipital regions at multi-wavelengths in NIR,” Physics in Medicine and Biology, vol. 47, no. 12, pp. 2075–2093, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. I. H. Jenkins, R. E. Passingham, and D. J. Brooks, “The effect of movement frequency on cerebral activation: a positron emission tomography study,” Journal of the Neurological Sciences, vol. 151, no. 2, pp. 195–205, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. Information from WFOT 2012, http://www.wfot.org/.
  44. Information from comprehence survey of living conditions, 2010, (Japanese), http://www.mhlw.go.jp/toukei/list/dl/20-21-01.pdf.
  45. M. Rousseaux, B. Fimm, A. Cantagallo, M. Leclercq, and P. Zimmermann, “Attention disorders in cerebrovascular diseases,” in Applied Neuropsychology of Attention: Theory, Diagnosis and Rehabilitation, pp. 280–304, Psychology Press, London, UK, 2002. View at Google Scholar