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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2014, Article ID 541870, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/541870
Review Article

Adult Neuroplasticity: More Than 40 Years of Research

1German Primate Center, Leibniz Institute for Primate Research, Kellnerweg 4, 37077 Göttingen, Germany
2Department of Neurology, Medical School, University of Göttingen, 37075 Göttingen, Germany

Received 15 January 2014; Accepted 9 April 2014; Published 4 May 2014

Academic Editor: Paul Lucassen

Copyright © 2014 Eberhard Fuchs and Gabriele Flügge. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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