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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2014, Article ID 679509, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/679509
Research Article

Spinal fMRI of Interoceptive Attention/Awareness in Experts and Novices

1Department of Functional Brain Imaging, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Seiryo-machi 4-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575, Japan
2International Research Institute of Disaster Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575, Japan
3Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575, Japan
4Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575, Japan
5Institute of Nishino Breathing Method, Tokyo 150-0046, Japan
6Department of Respiratory Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai 980-8574, Japan
7South Miyagi Medical Center, Miyagi, Shibata 989-1253, Japan

Received 14 April 2014; Revised 29 May 2014; Accepted 30 May 2014; Published 17 June 2014

Academic Editor: Timothy Schallert

Copyright © 2014 Keyvan Kashkouli Nejad et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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