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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2014, Article ID 723915, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/723915
Review Article

Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Antidepressive Therapy: Shocking Relations

1Paracelsus Medical University, Institute of Experimental Neuroregeneration, Spinal Cord Injury and Tissue Regeneration Center Salzburg (SCI-TReCS), Strubergasse 22, 5020 Salzburg, Austria
2Paracelsus Medical University, Institute of Molecular Regenerative Medicine, Spinal Cord Injury and Tissue Regeneration Center Salzburg (SCI-TReCS), Strubergasse 22, 5020 Salzburg, Austria
3University Clinics of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy I, Paracelsus Medical University, Ignaz-Harrer-Straße 79, 5020 Salzburg, Austria

Received 31 January 2014; Accepted 25 April 2014; Published 22 May 2014

Academic Editor: Paul Lucassen

Copyright © 2014 Peter Rotheneichner et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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