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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 184083, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/184083
Review Article

New Insights on Retrieval-Induced and Ongoing Memory Consolidation: Lessons from Arc

1Instituto de Neurobiología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Campus Juriquilla, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Col. Juriquilla, 76230 Santiago de Querétaro, QRO, Mexico
2Instituto de Fisiología Celular, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México, DF, Mexico
3Departamento de Ciencias de la Salud, Unidad Lerma, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana (UAM), Avenida de las Garzas No. 10, 52005 Lerma, MEX, Mexico

Received 15 December 2014; Revised 26 February 2015; Accepted 3 March 2015

Academic Editor: Pedro Bekinschtein

Copyright © 2015 Jean-Pascal Morin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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