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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015, Article ID 186385, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/186385
Research Article

Acute Putrescine Supplementation with Schwann Cell Implantation Improves Sensory and Serotonergic Axon Growth and Functional Recovery in Spinal Cord Injured Rats

1The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA
2Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10021, USA
3Department of Anesthesiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA
4Department of Internal Medicine, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL 33612, USA
5Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA
6The Neuroscience Program, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA
7Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA

Received 11 March 2015; Revised 25 June 2015; Accepted 2 July 2015

Academic Editor: Bae Hwan Lee

Copyright © 2015 J. Bryan Iorgulescu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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