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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015, Article ID 307175, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/307175
Review Article

Neural Plasticity in Multiple Sclerosis: The Functional and Molecular Background

Department of Neurology and Stroke, Medical University of Lodz, Zeromskiego Street 113, 90-549 Lodz, Poland

Received 9 March 2015; Revised 9 June 2015; Accepted 21 June 2015

Academic Editor: Lucas Pozzo-Miller

Copyright © 2015 Dominika Justyna Ksiazek-Winiarek et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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