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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 307929, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/307929
Review Article

Are Visual Peripheries Forever Young?

Laboratory of Neuroplasticity, Department of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Pasteur 3, 02-093 Warsaw, Poland

Received 8 January 2015; Revised 3 March 2015; Accepted 13 March 2015

Academic Editor: Sarah L. Pallas

Copyright © 2015 Kalina Burnat. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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