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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 394820, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/394820
Research Article

Activation of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin in the Rostral Ventromedial Medulla Contributes to the Maintenance of Nerve Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Rat

1Department of Anatomy and K. K. Leung Brain Research Centre, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710000, China
2Department of Neurosurgery, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710000, China
3Basic Medical College, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001, China
4Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China

Received 11 May 2015; Accepted 6 July 2015

Academic Editor: Yun Guan

Copyright © 2015 Jian Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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