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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 504691, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/504691
Review Article

Neuroplasticity Underlying the Comorbidity of Pain and Depression

1Department of Anesthesiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA
2Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA

Received 5 December 2014; Accepted 10 February 2015

Academic Editor: Geun Hee Seol

Copyright © 2015 Lisa Doan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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