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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015, Article ID 523250, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/523250
Research Article

Effects of Exercise in Immersive Virtual Environments on Cortical Neural Oscillations and Mental State

1Institute of Movement and Neurosciences, German Sport University Cologne, Am Sportpark Müngersdorf 6, 50933 Cologne, Germany
2Institute of Visual Computing and Department of Computer Science, Bonn-Rhein-Sieg University of Applied Sciences, Grantham-Allee 20, 53757 Sankt Augustin, Germany
3Department of Computer Science and Engineering, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M3J 1P3
4Faculty of Computer Science, University of New Brunswick, 550 Windsor Street, Fredericton, NB, Canada E3B 5A3
5School of Health and Sport Sciences, Faculty for Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore DC, QLD 4558, Australia

Received 8 April 2015; Revised 3 August 2015; Accepted 3 August 2015

Academic Editor: James M. Wyss

Copyright © 2015 Tobias Vogt et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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