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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015, Article ID 608581, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/608581
Review Article

Physical Exercise as a Diagnostic, Rehabilitation, and Preventive Tool: Influence on Neuroplasticity and Motor Recovery after Stroke

1Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, ISM UMR 7287, 13288 Marseille, France
2Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis et Université de Sud Toulon-Var, LAMHESS, UPRES EA 6309, 06204 Nice, France

Received 30 January 2015; Revised 3 June 2015; Accepted 18 June 2015

Academic Editor: Brandon A. Miller

Copyright © 2015 Caroline Pin-Barre and Jérôme Laurin. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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