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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015, Article ID 616242, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/616242
Clinical Study

Neurophysiological Correlates of Central Fatigue in Healthy Subjects and Multiple Sclerosis Patients before and after Treatment with Amantadine

1Department of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience, Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology Section, Brain Investigation & Neuromodulation Lab. (Si-BIN Lab), University of Siena, 53100 Siena, Italy
2Berenson-Allen Center for Noninvasive Brain Stimulation, Beth Israel Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA
3Unit of Neurology, Azienda Sanitaria di Firenze, 50121 Florence, Italy

Received 1 March 2015; Accepted 17 June 2015

Academic Editor: Preston E. Garraghty

Copyright © 2015 Emiliano Santarnecchi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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