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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015, Article ID 650780, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/650780
Review Article

Behavioral Tagging: A Translation of the Synaptic Tagging and Capture Hypothesis

1Instituto de Biologia Celular y Neurociencias “Dr. Eduardo De Robertis”, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, C1121ABG Buenos Aires, Argentina
2Departamento de Fisiologia, Biologia Molecular y Celular Dr. Hector Maldonado, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, C1428EGA Buenos Aires, Argentina

Received 12 January 2015; Accepted 12 March 2015

Academic Editor: Emiliano Merlo

Copyright © 2015 Diego Moncada et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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