Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 651469, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/651469
Research Article

CREB Regulates Experience-Dependent Spine Formation and Enlargement in Mouse Barrel Cortex

1Laboratory of Psychobiology, Santa Lucia Foundation, 00143 Rome, Italy
2“Tor Vergata” University, 00173 Rome, Italy
3Institute of Cell Biology and Neurobiology (IBCN), National Research Council, 00015 Rome, Italy

Received 11 February 2015; Revised 31 March 2015; Accepted 1 April 2015

Academic Editor: Lucas Pozzo-Miller

Copyright © 2015 Annabella Pignataro et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. Y. Zuo, G. Yang, E. Kwon, and W.-B. Gan, “Long-term sensory deprivation prevents dendritic spine loss in primary somatosensory cortex,” Nature, vol. 436, no. 7048, pp. 261–265, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. A. J. G. D. Holtmaat, J. T. Trachtenberg, L. Wilbrecht et al., “Transient and persistent dendritic spines in the neocortex in vivo,” Neuron, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 279–291, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. A. J. Holtmaat, L. Wilbrecht, G. W. Knott, E. Welker, and K. Svoboda, “Experience-dependent and cell-type-specific spine growth in the neocortex,” Nature, vol. 441, no. 7096, pp. 979–983, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. G. W. Knott, A. Holtmaat, L. Wilbrecht, E. Welker, and K. Svoboda, “Spine growth precedes synapse formation in the adult neocortex in vivo,” Nature Neuroscience, vol. 9, no. 9, pp. 1117–1124, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. K. L. Bernardo and T. A. Woolsey, “Axonal trajectories between mouse somatosensory thalamus and cortex,” The Journal of Comparative Neurology, vol. 258, no. 4, pp. 542–564, 1987. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. J. T. Trachtenberg, B. E. Chen, G. W. Knott et al., “Long-term in vivo imaging of experience-dependent synaptic plasticity in adult cortex,” Nature, vol. 420, no. 6917, pp. 788–794, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. J. C. Fiala, J. Spacek, and K. M. Harris, “Dendritic spine pathology: cause or consequence of neurological disorders?” Brain Research Reviews, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 29–55, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. F. Aguado, C. Díaz-Ruiz, R. Parlato et al., “The CREB/CREM transcription factors negatively regulate early synaptogenesis and spontaneous network activity,” The Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 328–333, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. H. Marie, W. Morishita, X. Yu, N. Calakos, and R. C. Malenka, “Generation of silent synapses by acute in vivo expression of CaMKIV and CREB,” Neuron, vol. 45, no. 5, pp. 741–752, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. S. Impey, M. Davare, A. Lasiek et al., “An activity-induced microRNA controls dendritic spine formation by regulating Rac1-PAK signaling,” Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, vol. 43, no. 1, pp. 146–156, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. D. D. Murphy and M. Segal, “Morphological plasticity of dendritic spines in central neurons is mediated by activation of cAMP response element binding protein,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 94, no. 4, pp. 1482–1487, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. E. R. Kandel, “The molecular biology of memory storage: a dialogue between genes and synapses,” Science, vol. 294, no. 5544, pp. 1030–1038, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. B. E. Lonze and D. D. Ginty, “Function and regulation of CREB family transcription factors in the nervous system,” Neuron, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 605–623, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. S. Middei, A. Spalloni, P. Longone et al., “CREB selectively controls learning-induced structural remodeling of neurons,” Learning and Memory, vol. 19, no. 8, pp. 330–336, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. D. Sargin, V. Mercaldo, A. P. Yiu et al., “CREB regulates spine density of lateral amygdala neurons: implications for memory allocation,” Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, vol. 7, article 209, 9 pages, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. G. A. Gonzalez and M. R. Montminy, “Cyclic AMP stimulates somatostatin gene transcription by phosphorylation of CREB at serine 133,” Cell, vol. 59, no. 4, pp. 675–680, 1989. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. C. A. McClung and E. J. Nestler, “Regulation of gene expression and cocaine reward by CREB and ΔFosB,” Nature Neuroscience, vol. 6, no. 11, pp. 1208–1215, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. M. Mayford, M. E. Bach, Y. Y. Huang, L. Wang, R. D. Hawkins, and E. R. Kandel, “Control of memory formation through regulated expression of a CaMKII transgene,” Science, vol. 274, no. 5293, pp. 1678–1683, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. S. S. Newton, J. Thome, T. L. Wallace et al., “Inhibition of cAMP response element-binding protein or dynorphin in the nucleus accumbens produces an antidepressant-like effect,” The Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 22, no. 24, pp. 10883–10890, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. S. Middei, G. Houeland, V. Cavallucci, M. Ammassari-Teule, M. D'Amelio, and H. Marie, “CREB is necessary for synaptic maintenance and learning-induced changes of the ampa receptor GluA1 subunit,” Hippocampus, vol. 23, no. 6, pp. 488–499, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. L. Restivo, F. Ferrari, E. Passino et al., “Enriched environment promotes behavioral and morphological recovery in a mouse model for the fragile X syndrome,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 102, no. 32, pp. 11557–11562, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. S. Middei, L. Restivo, A. Caprioli, M. Aceti, and M. Ammassari-Teule, “Region-specific changes in the microanatomy of single dendritic spines over time might account for selective memory alterations in ageing hAPPswe Tg2576 mice, a mouse model for Alzheimer disease,” Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, vol. 90, no. 2, pp. 467–471, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. D. Schubert, J. F. Staiger, N. Cho, R. Kötter, K. Zilles, and H. J. Luhmann, “Layer-specific intracolumnar and transcolumnar functional connectivity of layer V pyramidal cells in rat barrel cortex,” The Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 21, no. 10, pp. 3580–3592, 2001. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. T. Kaneko and F. Fujiyama, “Complementary distribution of vesicular glutamate transporters in the central nervous system,” Neuroscience Research, vol. 42, no. 4, pp. 243–250, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. K.-O. Cho, C. A. Hunt, and M. B. Kennedy, “The rat brain postsynaptic density fraction contains a homolog of the Drosophila discs-large tumor suppressor protein,” Neuron, vol. 9, no. 5, pp. 929–942, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. A. F. Mower, D. S. Liao, E. J. Nestler, R. L. Neve, and A. S. Ramoa, “cAMP/Ca2+ response element-binding protein function is essential for ocular dominance plasticity,” The Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 22, no. 6, pp. 2237–2245, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. S. Glazewski, A. L. Barth, H. Wallace, M. McKenna, A. Silva, and K. Fox, “Impaired experience-dependent plasticity in barrel cortex of mice lacking the alpha and delta isoforms of CREB,” Cerebral Cortex, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 249–256, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. T. A. Pham, S. Impey, D. R. Storm, and M. P. Stryker, “Cre-mediated gene transcription in neocortical neuronal plasticity during the developmental critical period,” Neuron, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 63–72, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. T. A. Pham, J. L. R. Rubenstein, A. J. Silva, D. R. Storm, and M. P. Stryker, “The CRE/CREB pathway is transiently expressed in thalamic circuit development and contributes to refinement of retinogeniculate axons,” Neuron, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 409–420, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. T. A. Pham, S. J. Graham, S. Suzuki et al., “A semi-persistent adult ocular dominance plasticity in visual cortex is stabilized by activated CREB,” Learning and Memory, vol. 11, no. 6, pp. 738–747, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. A. L. Barth, M. McKenna, S. Glazewski et al., “Up regulation of cAMP response element-mediated gene expression during experience-dependent plasticity in adult neocortex,” The Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 20, no. 11, pp. 4206–4216, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. A. Holtmaat and K. Svoboda, “Experience-dependent structural synaptic plasticity in the mammalian brain,” Nature Reviews Neuroscience, vol. 10, no. 9, pp. 647–658, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. S. Suzuki, H. Zhou, J. F. Neumaier, and T. A. Pham, “Opposing functions of CREB and MKK1 synergistically regulate the geometry of dendritic spines in visual cortex,” Journal of Comparative Neurology, vol. 503, no. 5, pp. 605–617, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. Y. Yoshihara, M. de Roo, and D. Muller, “Dendritic spine formation and stabilization,” Current Opinion in Neurobiology, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 146–153, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. C. Sala and M. Segal, “Dendritic spines: the locus of structural and functional plasticity,” Physiological Reviews, vol. 94, no. 1, pp. 141–188, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. S. Glazewski, B. L. Benedetti, and A. L. Barth, “Ipsilateral whiskers suppress experience-dependent plasticity in the barrel cortex,” Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 27, no. 14, pp. 3910–3920, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. D. H. Hubel and T. N. Wiesel, “The period of susceptibility to the physiological effects of unilateral eye closure in kittens,” The Journal of Physiology, vol. 206, no. 2, pp. 419–436, 1970. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. Ç. Eroglu, N. J. Allen, M. W. Susman et al., “Gabapentin receptor α2δ-1 is a neuronal thrombospondin receptor responsible for excitatory CNS synaptogenesis,” Cell, vol. 139, no. 2, pp. 380–392, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus