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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015, Article ID 787396, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/787396
Review Article

Glutamatergic Transmission: A Matter of Three

Laboratorio de Neurotoxicología, Departamento de Toxicología, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Apartado Postal 14-740, 07300 México, DF, Mexico

Received 3 February 2015; Accepted 18 March 2015

Academic Editor: Tomas Bellamy

Copyright © 2015 Zila Martínez-Lozada and Arturo Ortega. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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