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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 985083, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/985083
Research Article

Effects of Trace Metal Profiles Characteristic for Autism on Synapses in Cultured Neurons

1WG Molecular Analysis of Synaptopathies, Neurology Department, Neurocenter of Ulm University, 89081 Ulm, Germany
2Institute for Anatomy and Cell Biology, Ulm University, 89081 Ulm, Germany

Received 9 December 2014; Revised 19 January 2015; Accepted 19 January 2015

Academic Editor: Lucas Pozzo-Miller

Copyright © 2015 Simone Hagmeyer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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