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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1401935, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1401935
Research Article

Potential Role of Synaptic Activity to Inhibit LTD Induction in Rat Visual Cortex

1Department of Psychology, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6
2Center for Neuroscience Studies, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6

Received 10 June 2016; Revised 8 September 2016; Accepted 5 October 2016

Academic Editor: Christian Wozny

Copyright © 2016 Matthew R. Stewart and Hans C. Dringenberg. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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