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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 1867270, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1867270
Research Article

Age-Related Effects on Future Mental Time Travel

1Department of Psychology, University of Bologna, 40127 Bologna, Italy
2Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri Hospital IRCCS, 46042 Castel Goffredo, Italy
3Centro Studi e Ricerche in Neuroscienze Cognitive, 47023 Cesena, Italy
4Neuropsychiatry Lab, Faculty of Medicine, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical School, 91200 Jerusalem, Israel
5Department of Neurology, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, 91200 Jerusalem, Israel

Received 29 October 2015; Revised 29 February 2016; Accepted 23 March 2016

Academic Editor: Aage R. Møller

Copyright © 2016 Filomena Anelli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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