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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 2696085, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2696085
Research Article

Brain Connectomics’ Modification to Clarify Motor and Nonmotor Features of Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1

1Neuroimaging Laboratory, IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, Via Ardeatina 306, 00179 Rome, Italy
2Department of Engineering, “Roma Tre” University, Via Vito Volterra 62, 00154 Rome, Italy
3Department of Geriatrics, Orthopedics and Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Largo Agostino Gemelli 8, 00168 Rome, Italy
4UOC Neurologia e Neurofisiopatologia, AO San Camillo Forlanini, Via Portuense 332, 00149 Rome, Italy
5SPInal REhabilitation Lab (SPIRE), IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, Via Ardeatina 306, 00179 Rome, Italy
6Department of Clinical and Behavioural Neurology, IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, Via Ardeatina 306, 00179 Rome, Italy
7Department of Neuroscience, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Via Montpellier No. 1, 00133 Rome, Italy
8Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Brighton & Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, East Sussex BN1 9RR, UK
9Department of Neurology, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, University of Milan, Via Morandi 30, San Donato Milanese, 20097 Milan, Italy

Received 8 January 2016; Accepted 17 April 2016

Academic Editor: Zygmunt Galdzicki

Copyright © 2016 Laura Serra et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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