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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 2734915, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2734915
Research Article

Environmental Enrichment Therapy for Autism: Outcomes with Increased Access

1Mendability, LLC, 915 South 500 East, American Fork, UT 84003, USA
2Center for Autism Research and Translation, Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, 2205 McGaugh Hall, The University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-4550, USA

Received 30 March 2016; Revised 20 June 2016; Accepted 23 August 2016

Academic Editor: Susanna Pietropaolo

Copyright © 2016 Eyal Aronoff et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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