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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 2762518, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2762518
Research Article

Behavioral Deficits in Juveniles Mediated by Maternal Stress Hormones in Mice

1Department of Neuroscience, Tufts University School of Medicine, 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02111, USA
2Departments of Neurology and Physiology, The David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, 635 Charles Young Dr. South, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA

Received 18 June 2015; Revised 14 August 2015; Accepted 25 August 2015

Academic Editor: Laura Musazzi

Copyright © 2016 Jamie Maguire and Istvan Mody. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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