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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 3204519, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3204519
Review Article

Amyloid-β-Induced Dysregulation of AMPA Receptor Trafficking

Clem Jones Centre for Ageing Dementia Research, Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia

Received 11 January 2016; Accepted 28 February 2016

Academic Editor: Long-Jun Wu

Copyright © 2016 Sumasri Guntupalli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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