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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 4071620, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4071620
Review Article

Models to Tailor Brain Stimulation Therapies in Stroke

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
2School of Biomedical Sciences, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242, USA
3Human Cortical Physiology and Stroke Neurorehabilitation Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
4University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK
5Neurology Clinical Division, Neurology Department, Hospital das Clinicas, Sao Paulo University, 05508-090 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
6Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, 05652-900 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
7Center for Neurological Restoration, Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA

Received 1 August 2015; Revised 30 December 2015; Accepted 4 January 2016

Academic Editor: Bruno Poucet

Copyright © 2016 E. B. Plow et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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