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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4235898, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4235898
Review Article

Where Environment Meets Cognition: A Focus on Two Developmental Intellectual Disability Disorders

1Cellular and Systems Neurobiology, Systems Biology Program, Centre for Genomic Regulation, The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, 08003 Barcelona, Spain
2Pompeu Fabra University, 08003 Barcelona, Spain
3Genomic and Epigenomic Variation in Disease Group, Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, 08003 Barcelona, Spain

Received 1 February 2016; Accepted 3 April 2016

Academic Editor: Susanna Pietropaolo

Copyright © 2016 I. De Toma et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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