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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 4307694, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4307694
Research Article

Training-Induced Functional Gains following SCI

1Department of Anatomical Sciences & Neurobiology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA
2Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA
3Frazier Rehab Institute, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA
4Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA

Received 15 February 2016; Accepted 27 April 2016

Academic Editor: Malgorzata Kossut

Copyright © 2016 P. J. Ward et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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