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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 4959523, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4959523
Review Article

Role of MicroRNA in Governing Synaptic Plasticity

1Department of Neurosurgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, China
2Department of Neurosurgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Hunan Normal University (PLA 163 Hospital), Changsha 410000, China

Received 29 October 2015; Revised 6 January 2016; Accepted 14 February 2016

Academic Editor: Alexei Verkhratsky

Copyright © 2016 Yuqin Ye et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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