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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 5136286, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5136286
Review Article

The Involvement of Neuron-Specific Factors in Dendritic Spinogenesis: Molecular Regulation and Association with Neurological Disorders

Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan

Received 15 June 2015; Accepted 26 July 2015

Academic Editor: Deepak P. Srivastava

Copyright © 2016 Hsiao-Tang Hu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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