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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 5214961, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5214961
Review Article

Neuron-Glia Interactions in Neural Plasticity: Contributions of Neural Extracellular Matrix and Perineuronal Nets

1Department of Cell Morphology and Molecular Neurobiology, Faculty of Biology and Biotechnology, Ruhr-University, Universitätsstraße 150, 44801 Bochum, Germany
2International Graduate School of Neuroscience, Building FNO 01/114, Ruhr-University, Universitätsstraße 150, 44801 Bochum, Germany

Received 11 June 2015; Accepted 10 August 2015

Academic Editor: Daniela Carulli

Copyright © 2016 Egor Dzyubenko et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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