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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 5787423, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5787423
Review Article

Spindle Activity Orchestrates Plasticity during Development and Sleep

Developmental Neurophysiology, Institute of Neuroanatomy, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20251 Hamburg, Germany

Received 29 January 2016; Accepted 13 April 2016

Academic Editor: Adrien Peyrache

Copyright © 2016 Christoph Lindemann et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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