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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 6503162, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6503162
Review Article

Coping with the Forced Swim Stressor: Towards Understanding an Adaptive Mechanism

1Division of Medical Pharmacology and Leiden Academic Center for Drug Research, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden, Netherlands
2Division of Endocrinology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333 ZA Leiden, Netherlands
3Institute of Psychology, Leiden University, Wassenaarseweg 52, 2333 AK Leiden, Netherlands
4Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333 ZA Leiden, Netherlands

Received 15 September 2015; Accepted 19 October 2015

Academic Editor: Jordan Marrocco

Copyright © 2016 E. R. de Kloet and M. L. Molendijk. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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