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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 6762086, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6762086
Research Article

Drosophila Torsin Protein Regulates Motor Control and Stress Sensitivity and Forms a Complex with Fragile-X Mental Retardation Protein

1Department of Biomedical Gerontology, Graduate School of Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 24252, Republic of Korea
2Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 14066, Republic of Korea
3Korea Basic Science Institute, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Republic of Korea

Received 25 January 2016; Revised 28 March 2016; Accepted 7 April 2016

Academic Editor: Clive R. Bramham

Copyright © 2016 Phuong Nguyen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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