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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 6808293, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6808293
Review Article

Axon Initial Segment Cytoskeleton: Architecture, Development, and Role in Neuron Polarity

Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA

Received 5 February 2016; Accepted 22 May 2016

Academic Editor: Long-Jun Wu

Copyright © 2016 Steven L. Jones and Tatyana M. Svitkina. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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